Why did the British establish a trading port in Southeast Asia?

British trading ships were heavily taxed at Dutch ports, stifling British trade in the region. Raffles reasoned that the way to challenge the Dutch was to establish a new port in the region. Existing British ports were not in a strategic enough position to becoming major trading centres.

Why did the British wanted to establish a trading port in Southeast Asia?

The Dutch wanted to keep the East Indies (area of Malaysia and Indonesia) to themselves and started to impose restrictive trade policies against the British. … Most of the British India-China trades went through this passageway. Hence, Raffles was convinced to find another port along the straits to thwart the Dutch.

Why did the British need a new port?

A third port in the Malay Archipelago was needed by the British because they had to break the trading monopoly of the Dutch. With the Dutch taking more and more of the Malay Archipelago, they shut the British out of the trade. … Secondly, the British had to protect their trade with China.

Why did Raffles choose Singapore?

Raffles, then the Lieutenant-Governor of Bencoolen (now Bengkulu) in Sumatra, landed in Singapore on 29 January 1819. Recognising the immense potential of the swamp-covered island, he helped negotiate a treaty with the local rulers and established Singapore as a trading station.

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Why did British chose Singapore as a trading port?

Due to Singapore’s central location in the region, British trading ships could stop at Singapore to conveniently trade, rest and replenish food and water. This allowed the British trading ships to carry more trading goods rather than supplies and thus generate more trade profit.

Why did British choose Singapore as a port?

The harbor, being closer to the island itself would make it easier for the British to defend the harbor from pirates, making it safer. The geographic properties of Singapore, therefore allowed it to be chosen as the place where a port would be set-up.

Who bought Singapore in 1819?

Signing the 1819 Treaty – On 6 February, 1819, a treaty was signed between Sir Stamford Raffles, Temenggong Abdul Rahman and Sultan Hussein Shah of Johor, allowing the British East India Company (EIC) to set up a trading post in Singapore.

Is Singapore still a free port today?

The Port of Singapore is a free port, and the trade thereof is open to ships and vessels of every nation, equally and alike to all.” … Almost exactly two centuries later, Singapore remains one of the world’s busiest and most strategically important maritime hubs.

What was Singapore called before?

ABOUT “SINGAPURA BEFORE 1819”

The earliest records in which Singapore is mentioned describe it as a thriving port in the 14th century. It was known by different names then: The Chinese traders called it Danmaxi (Temasik or Temasek), while in the Sejarah Melayu (The Malay Annals), it was called Singapura.

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Who named Singapore?

However, the original legend was that a long time ago, a 14th century Sumatran prince spotted an auspicious beast upon landing on the island after a thunderstorm, which he was told was a ‘lion’. Thus, the name Singapore comes from the Malay words “Singa” for lion and “Pura” for city.

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